AIHA Virtual Education Seminar Launches Live in June

AIHA will launch its 2000 live TeleWeb Virtual Seminars starting June 29 with a talk by Thomas T. Nelson, CIH, president of NIHS Inc.

The American Industrial Hygiene Association is taking training to the Internet.

AIHA will launch its 2000 live TeleWeb Virtual Seminars on June 29 at 2 p.m. with a talk by Thomas T. Nelson, CIH, president of NIHS Inc. titled "Respirator Cartridges: How to Set a Replacement Schedule."

There will also be an encore presentation on Oct. 30 at 2 p.m.

Nelson will discuss how the service life of cartridges and canisters is limited and address how often cartridges should be changed.

His course is designed to provide participants with recommendations on how to obtain necessary performance data for cartridges, how to interpret test results and how to set a replacement schedule.

Nelson will also cover OSHA's revised respirator protection standard.

AIHA said its virtual seminars are a move to meet the needs of its growing technological society.

"Through these virtual seminars, participants will be able to interact live with instructors as well as fellow attendees," said Carol Tobin, AIHA director of meeting and education. "Participants will gather new information, receive reinforcement through post-tests and learn from leaders in the IH industry. Also, this convenient and cost-effective format allows industrial hygienists to obtain Cms and CEUs on their own time in a comfortable atmosphere."

The TeleWeb Virtual Seminars are live web events that take participants through the same steps as traditional courses while allowing them to utilize the latest technological advances via the Internet and telephone.

To register for "Respirator Cartridges: How to Set a Replacement Schedule," call (800) 775-7654.

For additional information on AIHA's TeleWeb Virtual Seminars or for a complete listing of upcoming distance learning programs, go to www.aiha.org/ce.html.

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