Xerox Cited for Lack of Safety Plan Following Killings

The Hawaii Occupational Safety and Health Division cited Xerox\r\nHawaii for failing to implement a safety program after an employee\r\nshot and killed seven co-workers.

The Hawaii Occupational Safety and Health Division cited Xerox Hawaii for failing to implement a safety program after an employee shot and killed seven co-workers in November 1999.

Bryan Uyesugi, a copier technician for Xerox at the time of the murders, was found guilty in June and is serving a life sentence without possibility of parole.

In the worst case of mass murder in Hawaii history, Uyesugi hid a holstered gun under his aloha shirt and opened fire on his co-workers on Nov. 2, 1999.

In 1993, Uyesugi was heard to have threatened employees.

In response, Xerox Hawaii assembled a crisis intervention team made up security, management and a psychiatrist and Uyesugi was offered the choice of voluntarily admitting himself to a hospital or being terminated.

Uyesugi was diagnosed with a delusional disorder and later returned to work.

The company was cited Nov. 1, for two other-than-serious violations under a Hawaii standard requiring employers to have safety programs in place.

No penalties were assessed, according to HIOSHA.

Xerox said it will appeal the HIOSHA citations.

In a statement released earlier, Glenn Sexton, vice president and general manager of Xerox Hawaii said the company was disappointed with the state''s action and "strongly disagrees with the agency''s conclusions."

by Virginia Sutcliffe

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