OSHA to Begin Collecting 2000 Injury, Illness Data

OSHA will begin distributing calendar year 2000 occupational injury and illness data collection forms next week, to approximately 80,000 employers nationwide.

As part of its annual collection of occupational injury and illness data, OSHA will begin distributing calendar year 2000 occupational injury and illness data collection forms (OSHA Form 196) next week, to approximately 80,000 employers nationwide.

"This annual collection initiative improves OSHA''s ability to identify and target our efforts on the more hazardous workplaces," said Acting OSHA Administrator R. Davis Layne. "The more effectively we utilize our resources, the more we can improve workplace safety and health for America''s workers."

The 2000 data will allow the agency to calculate occupational injury and illness rates by specific employer establishments.

The information will be used to focus OSHA activities such as inspections, outreach, consultations, technical assistance and target hazardous work sites under the Site Specific Targeting plan.

Specifically, OSHA said it is using the data to determine if there is a reduction in injury and illness rates at establishments where the agency had an intervention.

Companies that receive the OSHA Form 196 in the mail are required to provide average employment, hours worked and a summary of the occupational injuries and illnesses that occurred in an establishment in 2000.

OSHA said employers should complete and return the form or respond via the Internet within 30 days, even if there are no occupational injuries or illnesses recorded on their 2000 OSHA No. 200.

Completed forms can be returned by mail or fax, or via the Internet, using a secure electronic version of the form.

The electronic form can be accessed online at www.osha.gov/form196/cy00.htm.

The data collection initiative will include mail and telephone follow-up to ask clarifying questions concerning data submitted, and to attempt to obtain responses from non-responders.

According to OSHA, non-respondents may be subject to OSHA enforcement actions.

by Virginia Sutcliffe

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish