Making Science Work in Safety

A first-time ever symposium will show attendees at this year's National Safety Council Congress how research findings can help them in their jobs as occupational safety and health professionals.

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At this year''s National Safety Council''s (NSC) Congress & Expo, the council is offering a new symposium on Making Science Work for You. Presented in six technical sessions, this first-time ever symposium will show attendees how research findings can help them in their jobs as occupational safety and health professionals.

"Researchers who want to improve communications with those who use their work and who seek to learn the safety needs of the real-world in order to guide their future studies will find the symposium especially helpful," said NSC.

Participants can come to one session or to all. Participants will learn how simple evaluations can document the success of injury prevention programs; how using injury and illness data to drive programs can lead to more effective use of resources; and how science can make participants more successful in their jobs in the long run.

Key topics will include: Using Injury Surveillance Data; and Intervention Evaluation Tools for the Workplace. Case studies and findings will be presented on: Communication Towers; Head Injuries and Glove Use; Forklift and Pedestrian Collisions; Firefighters'' Uniforms; Falls in Residential and Drywall Carpentry; Nail Gun Injuries in Construction; Participatory Ergonomics Teams; Ergonomics in Retail Ice Cream Operations; and Back Injury Prevention Programs in Nursing Homes.

There is no extra fee for this symposium and no special ticket required. Admission is included in the cost of the conference.

NSC''s 2001 Congress & Expo will take place Sept. 21-28, in Atlanta, Ga., at the Georgia World Congress Center.

by Virginia Foran

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