EPA Targets Non-road Engines for Emission Reductions

Emissions from engines that are used in snowmobiles, off-road motorcycles and heavy machinery are\r\ntargeted for reduction under a new EPA program.

Emissions from engines that are used in snowmobiles, off-road motorcycles and all terrain vehicles, and heavy machinery are targeted for reduction under a new EPA program.

Under the regulatory proposal, the emissions of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides would be cut. EPA says the new rules would protect people who work with or near these engines from exposure to air toxics and will also help cut down the amount of pollution emitted in National Parks.

"If left unregulated, pollution from these sources will continue to increase, becoming a larger part of the overall mobile source pollution," said EPA Administrator Christie Whitman. "When fully implemented, this action will not only protect public health, but will help to restore the view of our nation''s treasured scenic parks and wilderness areas."

According to EPA, these types of engines generate 13 percent of mobile source hydrocarbon emissions, six percent of mobile source carbon monoxide emissions and three percent of mobile source nitrogen oxides emissions. The proposed standards are expected to reduce carbon monoxide emissions up to 56 percent and hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides emissions up to nearly 80 percent when fully implemented.

Specifically, the engine groups include: large industrial spark ignition engines, typically car engines used in heavy machinery; recreational diesel marine engines, engines used in yachts and other pleasure craft; off-road motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles; and snowmobiles.

EPA will hold public hearings in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 24, and in Denver, Colo., on Oct. 30. Detailed information about the hearings and on submitting written comments will be published in the Federal Register and at www.epa.gov/otaq.

by Virginia Foran

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