'Best & Worst' Developments for Small Businesses

The Small Business Survival Committee releases its list of developments that had the best and worst impact on small businesses in 2001.

The Small Business Survival Committee, a 70,000 member nonprofit small business advocacy organization based in Washington, D.C., has released its list of developments that had the best and worst impact on small businesses in 2001.

"Our list looks at the factors that had the best and worst impact on small businesses and the small business economy over the past year. It includes economic, policy, and cultural factors that have had a significant impact in shaping how small businesses fare across the country as a whole," said SBSC President Darrell McKigney.

As far as "Best" developments for small business in 2000, several issues we''ve covered here on Occupationalhazards.com.

Number five on the "Best" list was the scuttling of the Kyoto Treaty. The SBSC refers to it as "putting Chicken Little back in her hen house," noting that President Bush declined to impose "the destructive regulations" required by the Kyoto global climate treaty. "On the basis of fanciful environmental theories, the treaty would have iced countless U.S. businesses and jobs," says the SBSC.

Another good move, according to the SBSC: the move by Congress and the Bush administration to stop ergonomic regulations. "Congress and President Bush repealed a host of onerous ergonomic rules and regulations issued at the last minute by former President Clinton. The rules would have cost some $125 billion to implement," according to the SBSC.

Other "Bests" include: passage of the Bush tax cut package; deep interest rate cuts; sharply lower energy prices; moratorium on Internet taxes; settling the Microsoft suit; and the strong openings of Harry Potter and The Lord of the Rings (strong movie openings signal turnaround for entertainment and hospitality industries).

Events that made the "Worst" list include Sept. 11; the recession; blackouts in California; return of death taxes; change in Senate leadership; no trade clause; and no national energy plan.

by Sandy Smith (ssmith@penton.com)

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