Flexible Work Arrangements Get Full-time Attention

Want to keep employees happy? If so, say experts, then be flexible when it comes to options such as job sharing and setting work hours .

Want to keep employees happy? If so, say experts, then be flexible when it comes to options such as job sharing and setting work hours.

A new study by Best Practices LLC reveals how top organizations structure flexible work schedules that complement employees'' varying needs.

"Employee Retention: Managing the Part-Time Professional" unveils how Fortune 500 companies use flex-time, compressed work weeks, job sharing and telecommuting to accommodate employees. For example, one world-class transportation company has outlined career tracks for all employees that objectively reflect employee goals, abilities and experience. This system increases part-time employees'' satisfaction since these workers have the same advancement opportunities as full-time personnel.

The leading practices, managerial insights, and benchmark metrics in "Employee Retention: Managing the Part-Time Professional" are drawn from lessons learned interviews with 22 companies across 13 industries.

The study shows managers how to:

  • Communicate flexible workforce goals and policies to ensure alignment and buy-in throughout the organization.
  • Incorporate flexible schedule components directly into manager training.
  • Provide continuing resources to ensure success with flex-time employees.
  • Evaluate employees according to objective criteria and ensure that productivity is not sacrificed for flexibility.
  • Create distinct flex-time reward and recognition programs.

"Productivity is no longer simply a matter of having bodies at desks," notes Best Practices CEO Chris Bogan. "Companies are reaping great rewards when they strive to meet the unique needs of their employees."

Copies of the study are available at www.benchmarkingreports.com/r/r38.htm.

by Sandy Smith ([email protected])

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