Three Pennsylvania Employers Sentenced for Workers' Comp Violations

Three Pennsylvania employers have been sentenced for failing to maintain workers' compensation coverage on their employees, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry's Bureau of Workers' Compensation compliance unit.

The employers are:

  • Ronald Blystone, owner of Dewey's Dry Dock & Deli Company in Harrisburg, who was entered into a rehabilitation program for first-time offenders, placed on probation for 12 months, ordered to pay $631.50 in prosecution costs, ordered to perform 50 hours of community service and ordered to pay restitution to the injured employee in the amount of $9,600 by the Dauphin County Court of Common Pleas. Dewey's Dry Dock & Deli Company is no longer in business, according to the bureau.
  • Eric Williams, owner of Kemo Sabe Enterprise in Allentown, who pleaded guilty to three misdemeanor counts of the third degree in the Lehigh County Court of Common Pleas. Williams was placed on probation for 24 months, ordered to pay the costs of prosecution and pay restitution in the amount of $5,532 for the injuries sustained by his employee. Kemo Sabe Enterprises is no longer in business, according to the bureau.
  • Diane Zook, owner of Diane's Wind Gap Texaco in Wind Gap, was placed on probation for 12 months, ordered to pay $380.50 in prosecution costs and a $300 supervision fee in the Northampton County Court of Common Pleas. The judge also ordered Zook to pay $1,837 in restitution to the injured employee. Diane's Wind Gap Texaco is in compliance with the Pennsylvania workers' compensation law, according to bureau records.

Section 305 of the Pennsylvania Workers' Compensation Act specifies that an employer's failure to ensure its workers' compensation liability is a criminal offense, and classifies each day's violation as a separate offense -- either a third-degree misdemeanor, or if intentional, a third-degree felony.

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