OSHA Cites Plastics Company For Safety Hazards at Macon, Ga., Plant

OSHA has cited Grand Island, Neb.-based Diamond Plastics Corp. and has proposed penalties totaling $66,500 for alleged safety hazards observed during an inspection of the company's Macon, Ga., plant.

OSHA inspected the Macon plant after Diamond Plastics employees contacted the agency to report unsafe conditions that the company "failed to abate," according to Gei Thae Breezley, OSHA's Atlanta-East area director.

Breezley added that the inspection was conducted under a national emphasis program to reduce worker amputation injuries. The company had been cited previously for exposing workers to these safety hazards.

OSHA issued three repeat citations, with proposed penalties of $45,000, for allegedly:

  • Exposing workers to amputations from unguarded machinery;
  • Failing to train employees in lockout-tagout procedures to ensure that energized equipment was rendered inoperable during servicing and repair; and
  • Failing to maintain and assure that eyewash showers were available for employees working with and around corrosive chemicals.

The company also received seven serious citations, with proposed penalties of $21,500, for allegedly failing to:

  • Develop and implement procedures to control equipment energy sources during service and repair;
  • Inspect and properly maintain cranes and hoists;
  • Properly guard machinery; and
  • Assure that welding operations were conducted in an area free of combustible material.

An article in the Sept. 8 Macon Telegraph reported that Diamond Plastics planned to contest the OSHA fines. The article quoted a company official as saying Diamond Plastics has "addressed all OSHA concerns in a timely manner" after the agency inspected the Macon plant 6 months ago.

A phone call placed to Diamond Plastics' headquarters seeking comment was not immediately returned.

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