Mining Industry Helps Drive Indiana's Injury and Illness Rate to Decade Low

Mining Industry Helps Drive Indiana's Injury and Illness Rate to Decade Low

The Hoosier State's nonfatal occupational injury and illness rate declined for the first time since 2009.

The nonfatal occupational injury and illness rate for Indiana private-sector employers fell by 7 percent in 2012, according to the Indiana Department of Labor's Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.

The state's injury and illness rate of 4.0 per 100 workers marks its lowest rate since 1992, when Indiana began conducting the annual survey, and the first rate decline since 2009.

The state's mining industry made the biggest improvement, reducing its nonfatal injury and illness rate to 2.6 per 100 workers – a 45 percent drop.

The coalmining sub-industry experienced a 16 percent decline in nonfatal worker injuries and illnesses from 2011, according to the Indiana Department of Labor.

The survey, which analyzes data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, also found that:

  • Nearly all major industry categories in the state experienced a reduction in nonfatal worker injuries and illnesses in 2012.
  • Agriculture, health care and transportation - the state's emphasis industries - all reported a decrease in nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses (agriculture, 24.2 percent; health care, 15.9 percent; and transportation, 2.2 percent).
  • Several industry categories reported an increase in nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses from 2011 to 2012 (state and local government, 11 percent; arts, entertainment and recreation, 6 percent; and manufacturing, 2 percent).

"While this historically low number of workplace injuries in Indiana is indeed an accomplishment, we still have work to do and will continue to focus on reducing the number of workplace injuries in Indiana," said Rick Ruble, commissioner of the Indiana Department of Labor. "The Department of Labor will continue to actively work with employers through our many safety programs to continue to improve employee safety and health in Indiana."
 

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