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Omaha Public Works Employee Dies After Being Struck By Vehicle Thinkstock

Omaha Public Works Employee Dies After Being Struck By Vehicle

Salvatore Fidore dies despite having the proper protective equipment and taking safety precautions.

Despite wearing the proper protective equipment, Salvatore Fidone was hit and killed while performing road repairs on Monday, Jan. 23.

The 48-year-old Omaha, Neb. public works employee was patching a pothole when a Toyota Camry swerved into the lane he was in and struck him, according to news reports. He was transported to a local hospital and passed away on Friday, Jan. 27.

Maintenance workers were wearing reflective vests, provided warnings to motorists and had their vehicles parked in the correct location, according to a preliminary investigation. The Camry driver has not been charged.

Tony Burkhalter, a representative of the Nebraska Public Employees Local 251 labor union, released a statement shortly after the accident.

“Salvatore is not only a member of Local 251, but a friend of all of us,” he said. “I have worked alongside of him and had the pleasure of training him for his position.  He is a fun guy, one who puts people first and has a strong dedication to his children. 

Fidone had been an Omaha city employee since Oct. 2015. He was an organ donor who was able to donate a kidney to his brother, according to the Omaha-World Herald.

He leaves behind his wife, two sons, parents, brothers and other family members. Fidone was a resident of Council Bluffs, Iowa.

“As a public works representative, we would like to point out to the public, that when you see us in the streets working, whether it is fixing a pothole, plowing snow, replacing concrete or repairing the sewers, be mindful that we have families too and we want to go home to them at the end of our shift just like you,” Burkhalter said. “This tragedy has affected all of us because it could have been any one us.”

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